Star Wars: The Last Jedi Spoiler thread

Replies

  • Boo
    3430 posts Member
    What a sad Ackbar and Luke is dead.......too many death in the new trilogy
    And who knows Snoke's another apprentice comng to episode IX to seek revenge on Kylo while taking down the Resistance?
    And who know that Solo: A Star Wars Story will reveal everything about Ben Solo and his life?

    Ben Solo (aka Kylo Ren) is not even an itch in his daddy's pants at the time of Solo: A Star Wars Story - so get that out of your head now.
  • Boo
    3430 posts Member
    As for Kylo & Rey in TLJ, Snoke made them see and feel exactly what he wanted - he is a manipulator.

    He made Kylo see the disappointment in Rey's heritage and with that her turn to his side. He also made Rey see Kylo's good and return to the light.

    At the end Kylo is a monster beyond redemption - he never could be turned, and neither could Rey - this was all Snoke's manipulation to get them together and before him. What he did not expect was Kylo's ambition and own manipulation that allowed for Snoke's death.

    Having said that - everything Snoke forced (no pun intended) into the minds of Kylo and Rey was nothing more than manipulation.

    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    If Snoke was calling users of the darkside to his service (hence palpatine hearing the call of the dark entity beyond known space) then perhaps he has more than one apprentice - Kylo. After all, Snoke is not Sith and therefore, there is no "Rule of Two" any more.

    This would not include the knights of Ren - as it is hinted that they are the force users and apprentice Jedi of Luke, who joined Kylo in the destruction of the Jedi academy - these are not Snoke's apprentices.

    So perhaps a new villain may make a play for the throne of Supreme Leader???
  • Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.
    xSWCr - Nov '15 shard - swgoh.gg kalidor-m
  • CaptainRex
    2713 posts Member
    edited February 2018
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.

    But when they teased for 2 STRAIGHT YEARS!!!. That and who Snoke is what really pi$$es me off about Last Jedi. You don't introduce giant cliffhangers like just to wave them away like it's nothing, which they did.
    #CloneHelmets4Life...VICTORY!!!! :smiley: "I don't like sand. It's coarse and rough and irritating and it gets everywhere."
  • CaptainRex wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.

    But when they teased for 2 STRAIGHT YEARS!!!. That and who Snoke is what really pi$$es me off about Last Jedi. You don't introduce giant cliffhangers like just to wave them away like it's nothing, which they did.

    *They* teased it? You haven’t considered the possibility that maybe it was the fans who overanalyzed it to the point where regardless of what happened, people would be **** off? At least Rian Johnson had the decency to surprise people and not conform to what was expected of him.
  • DatBoi
    3572 posts Member
    Also, idk why people say rey’s parentage “doesn’t mean anything”, “is pointless”, or “was lazy writing”. Her parents not being super important characters is incredibly significant, not to mention subverts a trope that’s been done to death.
  • leef
    12475 posts Member
    DatBoi wrote: »
    CaptainRex wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.

    But when they teased for 2 STRAIGHT YEARS!!!. That and who Snoke is what really pi$$es me off about Last Jedi. You don't introduce giant cliffhangers like just to wave them away like it's nothing, which they did.

    *They* teased it? You haven’t considered the possibility that maybe it was the fans who overanalyzed it to the point where regardless of what happened, people would be **** off? At least Rian Johnson had the decency to surprise people and not conform to what was expected of him.

    Not doing what was expected isn't necessarily a good thing though. Furthermore, there were plenty ways to "suprise" the audience that didn't include such a utterly lame death of snoke. The fight scene was pretty cool, but his death was just very meh. I mean, he was linking kylo and rey throught the force, but got "side stabbed" that easily? Don't get me started on finn killing phasma that easily. I mean, ****?
    Regardless of the fans overanalyzing snoke, he was most certainly build up in the previous movie. That's just a fact. He was the big dipper with a misterious background that left the viewer wondering. That was most certainly done intentionally.


    Save water, drink champagne!
  • leef wrote: »
    DatBoi wrote: »
    CaptainRex wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.

    But when they teased for 2 STRAIGHT YEARS!!!. That and who Snoke is what really pi$$es me off about Last Jedi. You don't introduce giant cliffhangers like just to wave them away like it's nothing, which they did.

    *They* teased it? You haven’t considered the possibility that maybe it was the fans who overanalyzed it to the point where regardless of what happened, people would be **** off? At least Rian Johnson had the decency to surprise people and not conform to what was expected of him.

    Not doing what was expected isn't necessarily a good thing though. Furthermore, there were plenty ways to "suprise" the audience that didn't include such a utterly lame death of snoke. The fight scene was pretty cool, but his death was just very meh. I mean, he was linking kylo and rey throught the force, but got "side stabbed" that easily? Don't get me started on finn killing phasma that easily. I mean, ****?
    Regardless of the fans overanalyzing snoke, he was most certainly build up in the previous movie. That's just a fact. He was the big dipper with a misterious background that left the viewer wondering. That was most certainly done intentionally.


    Phasma is technically not KIA. Also, Finn clearly lost very easily, Phasma just lost because of a lift ex machina, which is not smart, but still.

    His death was to show Kylo killing his past and taking control of his own life, by showing obedience and rebellion at the same time against Snoke. He did do what snoke thought he did: its just that snoke didnt realise that he himself was a viable target.
  • leef
    12475 posts Member
    swgohfan29 wrote: »

    His death was to show Kylo killing his past and taking control of his own life, by showing obedience and rebellion at the same time against Snoke. He did do what snoke thought he did: its just that snoke didnt realise that he himself was a viable target.

    That's too deep for my peanut brain to understand.
    Save water, drink champagne!
  • leef wrote: »
    swgohfan29 wrote: »

    His death was to show Kylo killing his past and taking control of his own life, by showing obedience and rebellion at the same time against Snoke. He did do what snoke thought he did: its just that snoke didnt realise that he himself was a viable target.

    That's too deep for my peanut brain to understand.

    Remember when snoke starting narrating what Kylo was going to do? Kylo did do it, just that he did it to Snoke instead of Rey
  • leef wrote: »
    DatBoi wrote: »
    CaptainRex wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.

    But when they teased for 2 STRAIGHT YEARS!!!. That and who Snoke is what really pi$$es me off about Last Jedi. You don't introduce giant cliffhangers like just to wave them away like it's nothing, which they did.

    *They* teased it? You haven’t considered the possibility that maybe it was the fans who overanalyzed it to the point where regardless of what happened, people would be **** off? At least Rian Johnson had the decency to surprise people and not conform to what was expected of him.

    Not doing what was expected isn't necessarily a good thing though. Furthermore, there were plenty ways to "suprise" the audience that didn't include such a utterly lame death of snoke. The fight scene was pretty cool, but his death was just very meh. I mean, he was linking kylo and rey throught the force, but got "side stabbed" that easily? Don't get me started on finn killing phasma that easily. I mean, ****?
    Regardless of the fans overanalyzing snoke, he was most certainly build up in the previous movie. That's just a fact. He was the big dipper with a misterious background that left the viewer wondering. That was most certainly done intentionally.


    I agree that subversion isn’t inherently good (lord knows TLJ is saturated with it), but at least with rey’s parentage I thought it was justified. With Snoke, my issue isn’t what happened or why kylo did what he did (all of that makes perfect sense thematically and narratively), i just dont like how the sequence is edited. The buildup to kylo killing snoke is so on the nose and obvious, you almost think he isn’t going to kill him because of how it just beats you over the head with it.

    “Yes, turn the lightsaber towards your true enemy...” (insert shots of kylo’s hand and saber slowly turning) “You would never betray me...” (meaningful reaction shots of rey and kylo) “Now ignite the blade and fulfill your destiny...“

    Like much of the film, I appreciate the ideas, situations, and themes, but the execution is questionable.
  • leef
    12475 posts Member
    i'm looking for the right word for it, but i can't find it. I wasn't engaged/invested/drawn in to the movie/characters. Alot of them died and i simply didn't care. Movie was entertaining, but not much more than that imo.
    Then again, my all time favourite movie is the big lebowski, so i'm probably not the target audience.
    Save water, drink champagne!
  • leef wrote: »
    i'm looking for the right word for it, but i can't find it. I wasn't engaged/invested/drawn in to the movie/characters. Alot of them died and i simply didn't care. Movie was entertaining, but not much more than that imo.
    Then again, my all time favourite movie is the big lebowski, so i'm probably not the target audience.

    What does The Big Lebowski have to do with your taste in star wars?
  • leef
    12475 posts Member
    DatBoi wrote: »
    leef wrote: »
    i'm looking for the right word for it, but i can't find it. I wasn't engaged/invested/drawn in to the movie/characters. Alot of them died and i simply didn't care. Movie was entertaining, but not much more than that imo.
    Then again, my all time favourite movie is the big lebowski, so i'm probably not the target audience.

    What does The Big Lebowski have to do with your taste in star wars?

    taste in movies in general, i'm not a sw fan. I watched the movie(s) because i play the game, not the other way around.
    Save water, drink champagne!
  • warmonkey
    1314 posts Member
    edited February 2018
    DatBoi wrote: »
    leef wrote: »
    i'm looking for the right word for it, but i can't find it. I wasn't engaged/invested/drawn in to the movie/characters. Alot of them died and i simply didn't care. Movie was entertaining, but not much more than that imo.
    Then again, my all time favourite movie is the big lebowski, so i'm probably not the target audience.

    What does The Big Lebowski have to do with your taste in star wars?
    leef wrote: »
    DatBoi wrote: »
    leef wrote: »
    i'm looking for the right word for it, but i can't find it. I wasn't engaged/invested/drawn in to the movie/characters. Alot of them died and i simply didn't care. Movie was entertaining, but not much more than that imo.
    Then again, my all time favourite movie is the big lebowski, so i'm probably not the target audience.

    What does The Big Lebowski have to do with your taste in star wars?

    taste in movies in general, i'm not a sw fan. I watched the movie(s) because i play the game, not the other way around.

    Lebowski is one of my all time favorite movies, I have been in the mood for lebowski gifs so dropped a few yesterday actually in discord lol. Also love SW. Why not both?

    Although for first time in my life I'm not interested in continuing watching the SW universe in movies. It's not interesting anymore what they are doing with it. I loved TFA and was 110% really excited to follow Rey's adventures but now I pretend the TLJ never happened which I seem to need to do now to enjoy all previous SW stories.
  • All the hate for TLJ boggles me. I really enjoyed the film and think that it sets up the answers to the questions asked above in the third movie.

    The Resistance is dead for the next 10 years while they wait for all the broom boys at the end to come around (yes, there was only one, but it was symbolic not literal), so what will the next movie cover if not looking into the past more? I think that in the final movie of the trilogy we will learn Snoke's origin, and Rey's as well. The idea of her being a secret Skywalker is flawed though, as someone pointed out (they would NEVER leave her the way she was left), but the idea of her being a Kenobi is strong. No, not Obi-Wan's daughter as she is too young for that, but perhaps his granddaughter? Think about the Kylo connection with Vader and how he looks to his grandfather for guidance... symbolism...

    Force ghosts will awaken and give the answers next movie. Maybe there will be a secret revealed in Solo; an Obi-Wan cameo perhaps?

    OH...


    #RevanConfirmed
  • Boo
    3430 posts Member
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.


    It makes her the Mary Sue she is - dull.
  • Boo
    3430 posts Member
    All the hate for TLJ boggles me. I really enjoyed the film and think that it sets up the answers to the questions asked above in the third movie.

    The Resistance is dead for the next 10 years while they wait for all the broom boys at the end to come around (yes, there was only one, but it was symbolic not literal), so what will the next movie cover if not looking into the past more? I think that in the final movie of the trilogy we will learn Snoke's origin, and Rey's as well. The idea of her being a secret Skywalker is flawed though, as someone pointed out (they would NEVER leave her the way she was left), but the idea of her being a Kenobi is strong. No, not Obi-Wan's daughter as she is too young for that, but perhaps his granddaughter? Think about the Kylo connection with Vader and how he looks to his grandfather for guidance... symbolism...

    Force ghosts will awaken and give the answers next movie. Maybe there will be a secret revealed in Solo; an Obi-Wan cameo perhaps?

    OH...


    #RevanConfirmed

    If she was Luke's daughter - Kylo could have rescued her from the destruction of Luke's academy (her vision shows or hints that she was protected by Kylo's saber from an attacker). The good in Kylo could have saved her but abandoned her on Jakku - everyone else believing her to be dead.

    Maz asks Han "Who's the girl" and the scene cuts away.
    Kylo is angered by news of "a girl" on Jakku escaping with BB8 - in the Falcon no less.
    Kylo seems intent not killing Rey, whenever he has the chance.
    Anakin's/Luke's saber calls to Rey.
    Rey's overpowered connection to the force - something we have never seen, not even from the prophesized Chosen One

    Why wouldn't this make sense, if she was revealed as Luke's daughter. Perhaps believing his only daughter was killed due to his failings in training Ben Solo would give him more reason to be the hermit he was.

    But his reaction to seeing Rey in TLJ made it clear, she is not his daughter.

    Furthermore - Abrams left TFA with Luke anticipating Rey's arrival to Achto, standing on the edge of a cliff in full Jedi robes.

    Johnson takes over for TLJ, makes Luke not have a connection to the force (so why was he expecting Rey?), throw away his old lightsaber and run off into his hut to get into a rain coat (discarding his jedi attire) because he is so disturbed and sic of the jedi ways - why was he wearing his robes in the first place!????

    All of this makes me feel that Johnson took TLJ in a completely different direction from where Abrams was going.

    Abrams is taking the reins again - what will the 3rd installment of this trilogy be like now?
  • Boo wrote: »
    All the hate for TLJ boggles me. I really enjoyed the film and think that it sets up the answers to the questions asked above in the third movie.

    The Resistance is dead for the next 10 years while they wait for all the broom boys at the end to come around (yes, there was only one, but it was symbolic not literal), so what will the next movie cover if not looking into the past more? I think that in the final movie of the trilogy we will learn Snoke's origin, and Rey's as well. The idea of her being a secret Skywalker is flawed though, as someone pointed out (they would NEVER leave her the way she was left), but the idea of her being a Kenobi is strong. No, not Obi-Wan's daughter as she is too young for that, but perhaps his granddaughter? Think about the Kylo connection with Vader and how he looks to his grandfather for guidance... symbolism...

    Force ghosts will awaken and give the answers next movie. Maybe there will be a secret revealed in Solo; an Obi-Wan cameo perhaps?

    OH...


    #RevanConfirmed

    If she was Luke's daughter - Kylo could have rescued her from the destruction of Luke's academy (her vision shows or hints that she was protected by Kylo's saber from an attacker). The good in Kylo could have saved her but abandoned her on Jakku - everyone else believing her to be dead.

    Maz asks Han "Who's the girl" and the scene cuts away.
    Kylo is angered by news of "a girl" on Jakku escaping with BB8 - in the Falcon no less.
    Kylo seems intent not killing Rey, whenever he has the chance.
    Anakin's/Luke's saber calls to Rey.
    Rey's overpowered connection to the force - something we have never seen, not even from the prophesized Chosen One

    Why wouldn't this make sense, if she was revealed as Luke's daughter. Perhaps believing his only daughter was killed due to his failings in training Ben Solo would give him more reason to be the hermit he was.

    But his reaction to seeing Rey in TLJ made it clear, she is not his daughter.

    Furthermore - Abrams left TFA with Luke anticipating Rey's arrival to Achto, standing on the edge of a cliff in full Jedi robes.

    Johnson takes over for TLJ, makes Luke not have a connection to the force (so why was he expecting Rey?), throw away his old lightsaber and run off into his hut to get into a rain coat (discarding his jedi attire) because he is so disturbed and sic of the jedi ways - why was he wearing his robes in the first place!????

    All of this makes me feel that Johnson took TLJ in a completely different direction from where Abrams was going.

    Abrams is taking the reins again - what will the 3rd installment of this trilogy be like now?

    I hate you @Boo
    That would have made Last Jedi so good!
    #CloneHelmets4Life...VICTORY!!!! :smiley: "I don't like sand. It's coarse and rough and irritating and it gets everywhere."
  • Boo
    3430 posts Member
    CaptainRex wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    All the hate for TLJ boggles me. I really enjoyed the film and think that it sets up the answers to the questions asked above in the third movie.

    The Resistance is dead for the next 10 years while they wait for all the broom boys at the end to come around (yes, there was only one, but it was symbolic not literal), so what will the next movie cover if not looking into the past more? I think that in the final movie of the trilogy we will learn Snoke's origin, and Rey's as well. The idea of her being a secret Skywalker is flawed though, as someone pointed out (they would NEVER leave her the way she was left), but the idea of her being a Kenobi is strong. No, not Obi-Wan's daughter as she is too young for that, but perhaps his granddaughter? Think about the Kylo connection with Vader and how he looks to his grandfather for guidance... symbolism...

    Force ghosts will awaken and give the answers next movie. Maybe there will be a secret revealed in Solo; an Obi-Wan cameo perhaps?

    OH...


    #RevanConfirmed

    If she was Luke's daughter - Kylo could have rescued her from the destruction of Luke's academy (her vision shows or hints that she was protected by Kylo's saber from an attacker). The good in Kylo could have saved her but abandoned her on Jakku - everyone else believing her to be dead.

    Maz asks Han "Who's the girl" and the scene cuts away.
    Kylo is angered by news of "a girl" on Jakku escaping with BB8 - in the Falcon no less.
    Kylo seems intent not killing Rey, whenever he has the chance.
    Anakin's/Luke's saber calls to Rey.
    Rey's overpowered connection to the force - something we have never seen, not even from the prophesized Chosen One

    Why wouldn't this make sense, if she was revealed as Luke's daughter. Perhaps believing his only daughter was killed due to his failings in training Ben Solo would give him more reason to be the hermit he was.

    But his reaction to seeing Rey in TLJ made it clear, she is not his daughter.

    Furthermore - Abrams left TFA with Luke anticipating Rey's arrival to Achto, standing on the edge of a cliff in full Jedi robes.

    Johnson takes over for TLJ, makes Luke not have a connection to the force (so why was he expecting Rey?), throw away his old lightsaber and run off into his hut to get into a rain coat (discarding his jedi attire) because he is so disturbed and sic of the jedi ways - why was he wearing his robes in the first place!????

    All of this makes me feel that Johnson took TLJ in a completely different direction from where Abrams was going.

    Abrams is taking the reins again - what will the 3rd installment of this trilogy be like now?

    I hate you @Boo
    That would have made Last Jedi so good!

    Yup.

    TLJ = disappointment.
  • Boo wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.


    It makes her the Mary Sue she is - dull.

    Hey - I thought this thread was for TLJ bashing - keep your TFA bashes out of it! ;)
    xSWCr - Nov '15 shard - swgoh.gg kalidor-m
  • kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.


    It makes her the Mary Sue she is - dull.

    Hey - I thought this thread was for TLJ bashing - keep your TFA bashes out of it! ;)

    She was a dull Mary Sue in this one too lol
    #CloneHelmets4Life...VICTORY!!!! :smiley: "I don't like sand. It's coarse and rough and irritating and it gets everywhere."
  • CaptainRex wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.


    It makes her the Mary Sue she is - dull.

    Hey - I thought this thread was for TLJ bashing - keep your TFA bashes out of it! ;)

    She was a dull Mary Sue in this one too lol

    Except Johnson turned her natural strength into a vice that when coupled with a surface level understanding of the Force’s potential and a desire to define herself, gives her a natural affinity with the dark side. Rey was far more interesting in TLJ than TFA, and actually had to overcome personal flaws.
  • Boo
    3430 posts Member
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.


    It makes her the Mary Sue she is - dull.

    Hey - I thought this thread was for TLJ bashing - keep your TFA bashes out of it! ;)

    The Heroes Journey of Rey the Mary Sue continues in TLJ - even more so. She first beats Kylo in TFA and then beats Luke with a stick in TLJ - Luke...a jedi master????

    And the fact she is a 100% Mary Sue with absolutely no strong force sensitive blood relative to explain her powers is confirmed in TLJ.

    So, I am continuing to bash TLJ as per this thread.
  • Boo
    3430 posts Member
    DatBoi wrote: »
    CaptainRex wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.


    It makes her the Mary Sue she is - dull.

    Hey - I thought this thread was for TLJ bashing - keep your TFA bashes out of it! ;)

    She was a dull Mary Sue in this one too lol

    Except Johnson turned her natural strength into a vice that when coupled with a surface level understanding of the Force’s potential and a desire to define herself, gives her a natural affinity with the dark side. Rey was far more interesting in TLJ than TFA, and actually had to overcome personal flaws.

    Every other force sensitive or Jedi we have seen thus far struggles with the temptations of the Dark side - including a skilled and experienced Jedi Master - Luke Skywalker (when thinking of killing Ben Solo in his sleep).

    Rey although teased by the darkside here and there, never gives into it. In fact she snuffs it down with ease. Even Snoke says her heart is of a true Jedi - she was never gonna turn dark.

    Snoke also explains the source of her power of the force balancing itself due to the existence of Kylo Ren - so, she is powerful in the force...just because she is.

    If anything this just makes her more of a Mary Sue - completely 100% overpowered and has zero character flaws.
  • kalidor
    1569 posts Member
    edited February 2018
    I don't get the Mary Sue thing. The force has always been an innate part of the user. It can't be taught to anyone that's not force sensitive. What the Jedi taught was control and discipline so that the force user didn't become an out-of-control dark side maniac. Anakin was just as much of a prodigy when QGJ found him on Tatooine. Luke also demonstrated force skills in ANH with minimal training (destroying the death star without the aid of a targetting computer, something not even one of the best pilots in the fleet was able to do). They just didn't realize that their skill was from the force at the time, and neither did Rey.
    If you want to believe it's all in the blood, fine, but that seems to fly in the face of what Yoda taught in ESB and Luke taught in TLJ, not to mention most of the clone wars. But that sounds more dull to me than the force acting as a self-balancing entity.
    xSWCr - Nov '15 shard - swgoh.gg kalidor-m
  • Boo wrote: »
    DatBoi wrote: »
    CaptainRex wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.


    It makes her the Mary Sue she is - dull.

    Hey - I thought this thread was for TLJ bashing - keep your TFA bashes out of it! ;)

    She was a dull Mary Sue in this one too lol

    Except Johnson turned her natural strength into a vice that when coupled with a surface level understanding of the Force’s potential and a desire to define herself, gives her a natural affinity with the dark side. Rey was far more interesting in TLJ than TFA, and actually had to overcome personal flaws.

    Every other force sensitive or Jedi we have seen thus far struggles with the temptations of the Dark side - including a skilled and experienced Jedi Master - Luke Skywalker (when thinking of killing Ben Solo in his sleep).

    Rey although teased by the darkside here and there, never gives into it. In fact she snuffs it down with ease. Even Snoke says her heart is of a true Jedi - she was never gonna turn dark.

    Snoke also explains the source of her power of the force balancing itself due to the existence of Kylo Ren - so, she is powerful in the force...just because she is.

    If anything this just makes her more of a Mary Sue - completely 100% overpowered and has zero character flaws.

    The fact that I had no idea whether Rey would join Kylo shows that her character
    kalidor wrote: »
    I don't get the Mary Sue thing. The force has always been an innate part of the user. It can't be taught to anyone that's not force sensitive. What the Jedi taught was control and discipline so that the force user didn't become an out-of-control dark side maniac. Anakin was just as much of a prodigy when QGJ found him on Tatooine. Luke also demonstrated force skills in ANH with minimal training (destroying the death star without the aid of a targetting computer, something not even one of the best pilots in the fleet was able to do). They just didn't realize that their skill was from the force at the time, and neither did Rey.
    If you want to believe it's all in the blood, fine, but that seems to fly in the face of what Yoda taught in ESB and Luke taught in TLJ, not to mention most of the clone wars. But that sounds more dull to me than the force acting as a self-balancing entity.

    For me, it was the combination of natural skill with a strong moral code. She had no character flaws, therefore nothing to initiate an arc with. But I thought TLJ did a great job of giving her a desire to define herself and turning her strength into a burden. Too bad that was all neatly resolved at the end, effectively taking us back to square one for ep 9.
  • DatBoi wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    DatBoi wrote: »
    CaptainRex wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.


    It makes her the Mary Sue she is - dull.

    Hey - I thought this thread was for TLJ bashing - keep your TFA bashes out of it! ;)

    She was a dull Mary Sue in this one too lol

    Except Johnson turned her natural strength into a vice that when coupled with a surface level understanding of the Force’s potential and a desire to define herself, gives her a natural affinity with the dark side. Rey was far more interesting in TLJ than TFA, and actually had to overcome personal flaws.

    Every other force sensitive or Jedi we have seen thus far struggles with the temptations of the Dark side - including a skilled and experienced Jedi Master - Luke Skywalker (when thinking of killing Ben Solo in his sleep).

    Rey although teased by the darkside here and there, never gives into it. In fact she snuffs it down with ease. Even Snoke says her heart is of a true Jedi - she was never gonna turn dark.

    Snoke also explains the source of her power of the force balancing itself due to the existence of Kylo Ren - so, she is powerful in the force...just because she is.

    If anything this just makes her more of a Mary Sue - completely 100% overpowered and has zero character flaws.

    The fact that I had no idea whether Rey would join Kylo shows that her character
    kalidor wrote: »
    I don't get the Mary Sue thing. The force has always been an innate part of the user. It can't be taught to anyone that's not force sensitive. What the Jedi taught was control and discipline so that the force user didn't become an out-of-control dark side maniac. Anakin was just as much of a prodigy when QGJ found him on Tatooine. Luke also demonstrated force skills in ANH with minimal training (destroying the death star without the aid of a targetting computer, something not even one of the best pilots in the fleet was able to do). They just didn't realize that their skill was from the force at the time, and neither did Rey.
    If you want to believe it's all in the blood, fine, but that seems to fly in the face of what Yoda taught in ESB and Luke taught in TLJ, not to mention most of the clone wars. But that sounds more dull to me than the force acting as a self-balancing entity.

    For me, it was the combination of natural skill with a strong moral code. She had no character flaws, therefore nothing to initiate an arc with. But I thought TLJ did a great job of giving her a desire to define herself and turning her strength into a burden. Too bad that was all neatly resolved at the end, effectively taking us back to square one for ep 9.

    Well, other than the fact that she was/is a somewhat of a lost soul. "Finding her place in all this" seems to be her arc. And the last scene in TLJ left that door open (looking a bit longingly at Finn). That was her biggest vulnerability with Kylo - desperately wanting to belong somewhere, and he kept offering it. I hope that they keep that struggle in ep9.
    xSWCr - Nov '15 shard - swgoh.gg kalidor-m
  • kalidor wrote: »
    DatBoi wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    DatBoi wrote: »
    CaptainRex wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.


    It makes her the Mary Sue she is - dull.

    Hey - I thought this thread was for TLJ bashing - keep your TFA bashes out of it! ;)

    She was a dull Mary Sue in this one too lol

    Except Johnson turned her natural strength into a vice that when coupled with a surface level understanding of the Force’s potential and a desire to define herself, gives her a natural affinity with the dark side. Rey was far more interesting in TLJ than TFA, and actually had to overcome personal flaws.

    Every other force sensitive or Jedi we have seen thus far struggles with the temptations of the Dark side - including a skilled and experienced Jedi Master - Luke Skywalker (when thinking of killing Ben Solo in his sleep).

    Rey although teased by the darkside here and there, never gives into it. In fact she snuffs it down with ease. Even Snoke says her heart is of a true Jedi - she was never gonna turn dark.

    Snoke also explains the source of her power of the force balancing itself due to the existence of Kylo Ren - so, she is powerful in the force...just because she is.

    If anything this just makes her more of a Mary Sue - completely 100% overpowered and has zero character flaws.

    The fact that I had no idea whether Rey would join Kylo shows that her character
    kalidor wrote: »
    I don't get the Mary Sue thing. The force has always been an innate part of the user. It can't be taught to anyone that's not force sensitive. What the Jedi taught was control and discipline so that the force user didn't become an out-of-control dark side maniac. Anakin was just as much of a prodigy when QGJ found him on Tatooine. Luke also demonstrated force skills in ANH with minimal training (destroying the death star without the aid of a targetting computer, something not even one of the best pilots in the fleet was able to do). They just didn't realize that their skill was from the force at the time, and neither did Rey.
    If you want to believe it's all in the blood, fine, but that seems to fly in the face of what Yoda taught in ESB and Luke taught in TLJ, not to mention most of the clone wars. But that sounds more dull to me than the force acting as a self-balancing entity.

    For me, it was the combination of natural skill with a strong moral code. She had no character flaws, therefore nothing to initiate an arc with. But I thought TLJ did a great job of giving her a desire to define herself and turning her strength into a burden. Too bad that was all neatly resolved at the end, effectively taking us back to square one for ep 9.

    Well, other than the fact that she was/is a somewhat of a lost soul. "Finding her place in all this" seems to be her arc. And the last scene in TLJ left that door open (looking a bit longingly at Finn). That was her biggest vulnerability with Kylo - desperately wanting to belong somewhere, and he kept offering it. I hope that they keep that struggle in ep9.

    But I think that struggle is resolved when he decides to be just evil and she returns to her friends and the resistance.
  • Boo wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    kalidor wrote: »
    Boo wrote: »
    Is Rey's parents really nobodies?

    I hope so, and both films strongly hinted at that. The flashback of Rey being held by a merchant while a ship flies away suggests she was not just abandoned, but sold. Maz then goes on to tell her that "the belonging you seek is not in the past" and that Rey knows this to be true. The cave in TLJ shows Rey no one but herself, a pretty big clue that her parents are unimportant and/or dead. Kylo's revelation really isn't much of a surprise to her, just a confirmation of her worst fear, one which both movies spent a lot of effort reinforcing.
    Even before TLJ came out, her parents as regular folk was the most plausible theory to me. I couldn't see Leia, Luke, Han, or an heir of Kenobi's (?) just dropping a kid off on a desert planet. (With Luke & Tatooine, Kenobi stuck around). Palpatine would have just killed any offspring, and Vader, uh, how would that work post-suit?
    The force manifesting itself in children certainly isn't anything new in SW canon, and makes sense as the Jedi in the Republic were not allowed to have attachments and so couldn't breed more Jedi. A few of the Clone Wars episodes were even devoted to the collection and training of force sensitives to add to the Jedi ranks.
    There's a lot of stuff to pick apart in the TLJ, but I think the question of her parents is one of those things that was intended from the start of the trilogy. IMO, it makes Rey a much stronger character.


    It makes her the Mary Sue she is - dull.

    Hey - I thought this thread was for TLJ bashing - keep your TFA bashes out of it! ;)

    The Heroes Journey of Rey the Mary Sue continues in TLJ - even more so. She first beats Kylo in TFA and then beats Luke with a stick in TLJ - Luke...a jedi master????

    And the fact she is a 100% Mary Sue with absolutely no strong force sensitive blood relative to explain her powers is confirmed in TLJ.

    So, I am continuing to bash TLJ as per this thread.


    1. Luke
    2. Snoke
    3. Vader
    4. Anakin
    5. Palp.
    6. Ezra
    7. Rey
    8. Kannan
    9. Ashoka
    10. Obi Wan
    11. Yoda
    12. Dooku


    All had amazing powers. when they first came out, no one gave a **** about "who their parents are". Or Their revealed parents clearly did not show any Force powers.

    Why is number 7 so special
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