Which has the best chance to exist, Magic or the Force?

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  • I know it's the organic parts of a life form that connect to the force and not any mechno-limbs, but if, as a Kaleesh, Grievous was force-sensitive, would he be as powerful in the force as a cyborg? Yes, Ani lost quite a bit on Mustafar, but he still has his everything above the knees, which is a lot of body remaining; a lot of midi-chlorians remaining. He was weakened because of Obi-Wan. Grievous lost much more than Ani did, would he still have enough sensitivity to the force to be able to use it?

    I don't know about Obi Wan hurting Anakin's connection to the force. I do know that between his suit and by extention, his injuries, he wasn't as powerful and lost a lot of abilities.
    As for Grievous, according to his Wikipedia page, he was not force sensitive.

    IF! Do you people understand conditionals? I know Grievous was not force-sensitive and he never will be! I never said that he was, I'm saying IF he was force-sensitive!

    I get conditionals, calm down.
    So IF grievous WAS force sensitive, he would’ve lost some abilities like Vader did.
  • Telekinesis, is a popular theory of controlling objects with the mind. Sound familiar?

    I'm afraid this idea has been thoroughly debunked. There has been a lot of scientific research into alleged supernatural, extrasensory or psychic powers and other supposed parapsychological phenomena since the 1930s, much of it funded by the US government, and it all amounts to the realization that no such thing exists.

    The million-dollar challenge and the rigorous scientific tests of the James Randi Educational Foundation with individuals who claimed to have supernatural abilities are further proof that things like telekinesis, telepathy, fortune telling, clairvoyance etc. aren't real.

    Of course people who earn a living with theatrics like cold reading come up with all kinds of excuses as to why their claimed powers can't be demonstrated under controlled experimental conditions, and their fans and followers are eager to believe them. But from a scientific point of view, we can safely consider such powers to be improbable to the point of impossibility.

    Well, ya know.. Only a "Sith deals in absolutes". ;)

    Humor aside, given our history of persecution, and execution of any suspected of having supernatural powers, how ready do you think those with said abilities would be to own up to having them? I'm guessing zero. Food for thought.

    That's an odd view of history. From what I remember, it wasn't Giordano Bruno who burned witches at the stake. He was burned alongside them for scientific discoveries that challenged the predominant supernatural world view. History is largely a matter of supernatural believers killing other supernatural believers along with unbelievers for not believing in the same supernatural things.

    Besides, there are plenty of people in our day and age who claim to have magic or psychic powers. Mentalists, cold readers, faith healers etc. make a killing with their theatrics and stage perfomances. Do you see anyone persecuting or trying to kill them? Neither do I. We let them get away with defrauding the gullible because supernatural ideas are not to be challenged. We've even enshrined the freedom to believe in and ritually perform magic in our constitutions.

    PS: "Improbable to the point of impossibility" is not an absolute. It's a probability assessment based on the current state of research and knowledge. The scientific world view is not dogmatic and always remains open for new evidence. If anyone can conclusively prove that supernatural powers exist, we'll have to adjust our model of reality accordingly. But until then, based on everything we know so far, it seems so incredibly unlikely that it would be irrational to act based on the assumption that magic is real.

    Magic is the term applied to that which we cannot explain. Not too many Scientists were burned in Salem though, if any. I prefer to think there are many things I cannot explain, and I'm cool with that, an ordered universe, would be really dull. The day I don't learn something new, they'll be throwing dirt over from atop a deep hole. But, even then I may be learning. Jim Henson wrote a letter to his son in regards to his emminent passing away. He wrote, "I'm not sure what is coming next, but I'm very excited!" So, there's that.
    Leader: Grey Area 51 - My Squads: https://swgoh.gg/p/716522998/
  • I know it's the organic parts of a life form that connect to the force and not any mechno-limbs, but if, as a Kaleesh, Grievous was force-sensitive, would he be as powerful in the force as a cyborg? Yes, Ani lost quite a bit on Mustafar, but he still has his everything above the knees, which is a lot of body remaining; a lot of midi-chlorians remaining. He was weakened because of Obi-Wan. Grievous lost much more than Ani did, would he still have enough sensitivity to the force to be able to use it?

    I don't know about Obi Wan hurting Anakin's connection to the force. I do know that between his suit and by extention, his injuries, he wasn't as powerful and lost a lot of abilities.
    As for Grievous, according to his Wikipedia page, he was not force sensitive.

    IF! Do you people understand conditionals? I know Grievous was not force-sensitive and he never will be! I never said that he was, I'm saying IF he was force-sensitive!

    I get conditionals, calm down.
    So IF grievous WAS force sensitive, he would’ve lost some abilities like Vader did.

    No pudding for you if you can't behave.
    Leader: Grey Area 51 - My Squads: https://swgoh.gg/p/716522998/
  • I know it's the organic parts of a life form that connect to the force and not any mechno-limbs, but if, as a Kaleesh, Grievous was force-sensitive, would he be as powerful in the force as a cyborg? Yes, Ani lost quite a bit on Mustafar, but he still has his everything above the knees, which is a lot of body remaining; a lot of midi-chlorians remaining. He was weakened because of Obi-Wan. Grievous lost much more than Ani did, would he still have enough sensitivity to the force to be able to use it?

    I don't know about Obi Wan hurting Anakin's connection to the force. I do know that between his suit and by extention, his injuries, he wasn't as powerful and lost a lot of abilities.
    As for Grievous, according to his Wikipedia page, he was not force sensitive.

    IF! Do you people understand conditionals? I know Grievous was not force-sensitive and he never will be! I never said that he was, I'm saying IF he was force-sensitive!

    I get conditionals, calm down.
    So IF grievous WAS force sensitive, he would’ve lost some abilities like Vader did.

    No pudding for you if you can't behave.

    Wouldn’t be the first time I was sent to the cupboard under the stairs without pudding.
  • DuneSeaFarmer
    2862 posts Member
    edited February 7
    It's worth noting, that something as widely accepted as magic NOT existing outside of fantasy, it certainly has stood the test of time. Much like another "Magical, Mythical creation" Dragons. Again widely accepted as having not existed yet all recorded history on earth, mention them in some form. Funny that..
    Leader: Grey Area 51 - My Squads: https://swgoh.gg/p/716522998/
  • It's worth noting, that something as widely accepted as magic NOT existing outside of fantasy, it certainly has stood the test of time. Much like another "Magical, Mythical creation" Dragons. Again widely accepted as having not existed yet all recorded history on earth, mention them in some form. Funny that..

    Dragons could be an explanation for dinosaurs, but with magic, that is something different. Some of magic is wishful thinking, being able to bend the laws of physics. To be able to change something that is a constant to inspire something. Make ones enemies disappear or to bring a loved one back to life.
  • It's worth noting, that something as widely accepted as magic NOT existing outside of fantasy, it certainly has stood the test of time. Much like another "Magical, Mythical creation" Dragons. Again widely accepted as having not existed yet all recorded history on earth, mention them in some form. Funny that..

    Dragons could be an explanation for dinosaurs, but with magic, that is something different. Some of magic is wishful thinking, being able to bend the laws of physics. To be able to change something that is a constant to inspire something. Make ones enemies disappear or to bring a loved one back to life.

    In a broad sense this interaction touches on abilities or "magic" and the obtaining of them. I love Picards arguements with Q.

    Leader: Grey Area 51 - My Squads: https://swgoh.gg/p/716522998/
  • EA_Rtas
    648 posts EA Moderator
    edited February 11
    It's worth noting, that something as widely accepted as magic NOT existing outside of fantasy, it certainly has stood the test of time. Much like another "Magical, Mythical creation" Dragons. Again widely accepted as having not existed yet all recorded history on earth, mention them in some form. Funny that..

    Dragons could be an explanation for dinosaurs, but with magic, that is something different. Some of magic is wishful thinking, being able to bend the laws of physics. To be able to change something that is a constant to inspire something. Make ones enemies disappear or to bring a loved one back to life.

    In a broad sense this interaction touches on abilities or "magic" and the obtaining of them. I love Picards arguements with Q.

    Thats probably my favorite of Picard's speeches to Q throughout the whole series

    On topic, I personally always believed the NS were just more attuned to the more primal side of the dark side, similar to the force priestesses. That their "Magick" was borne from tribal knowledge of the dark side and its power.
    Post edited by EA_Rtas on
  • EA_Rtas wrote: »
    It's worth noting, that something as widely accepted as magic NOT existing outside of fantasy, it certainly has stood the test of time. Much like another "Magical, Mythical creation" Dragons. Again widely accepted as having not existed yet all recorded history on earth, mention them in some form. Funny that..

    Dragons could be an explanation for dinosaurs, but with magic, that is something different. Some of magic is wishful thinking, being able to bend the laws of physics. To be able to change something that is a constant to inspire something. Make ones enemies disappear or to bring a loved one back to life.

    In a broad sense this interaction touches on abilities or "magic" and the obtaining of them. I love Picards arguements with Q.

    Thats probably my favorite of Picard's speeches to Q throughout the whole series

    On topic, I personally always believed the NS were just more attuned to the more primal side of the dark side, similar to the force priestesses. That their "Magick" was borne from tribal knowledge of the dark side and its power.

    But even primal knowledge of the force is still the force, it is a much narrower view.
  • Magic is comprised of a skill set of knowing which "spell" to enact or "speak" to achieve desired results. Extensions were potions, artifacts, etc.. The Force has stories of such things as well. I would think the wielders connection to the force would dictate their skillset. i.e. Qui-Gon learning how to speak to the "living" from beyond the grave as it were.
    Leader: Grey Area 51 - My Squads: https://swgoh.gg/p/716522998/
  • Blackbeardpepe
    1194 posts Member
    edited February 18
    The force works in mysterious ways. If there are multiple dimensions ( more than what we can perceive), whos to say how the force interacts with in certain galaxies due to many astronomical anomalies. Maybe the force is weak in our Galaxy but stronger in others.

    I'd rather believe in the force, than magic.
  • The force works in mysterious ways. If there are multiple dimensions ( more than what we can perceive), whos to say how the force interacts with in certain galaxies due to many astronomical anomalies. Maybe the force is weak in our Galaxy but stronger in others.

    I'd rather believe in the force, than magic.

    I like the explanation in Thor about magic and science.

    Leader: Grey Area 51 - My Squads: https://swgoh.gg/p/716522998/
  • Dk_rek
    2497 posts Member
    edited February 26
    Not sure i’m too proud to be part of a species who 150 years ago drowned or burned people to death for even thinking about stuff like this meh prob still do in some places.....

    If I was the leader of some big universal intergalactic community shard chat humans would never get the invite.... i would not even let them get in the top 5000......the way we act and treat each other im sure we are seen as the cockroaches of the universe....

    “Hey bugaaaarrggakahrah”
    “Yeah ?”
    “Humans in top 5000”
    “Chain em back”

    Oh and magic what clarke said
  • When asked what humans were Spock replied. "Humans are the only species in the galaxy that feeds upon and wars with, themselves". Kirk once said "we're the most advanced barbarians on the planet".

    But thankfully we have grown, oh we have room for improvement, but that is what fuels us.
    Leader: Grey Area 51 - My Squads: https://swgoh.gg/p/716522998/
  • When asked what humans were Spock replied. "Humans are the only species in the galaxy that feeds upon and wars with, themselves". Kirk once said "we're the most advanced barbarians on the planet".

    But thankfully we have grown, oh we have room for improvement, but that is what fuels us.

    Striving to improve our species as a whole doesn't always drive us. Alfred said, "Some men just want to watch the world burn." Having such a vast population, one cannot and should not generalize an entire species.
  • Never say never
    Leader: Grey Area 51 - My Squads: https://swgoh.gg/p/716522998/
  • Never say never

    A "utopia" society is impossible. We would all have to share the exact same values, or be enslaved.
  • Okay pulling back onto the road.. lol

    Making A Generally Interesting Character even more so.
    Leader: Grey Area 51 - My Squads: https://swgoh.gg/p/716522998/
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