New Clue!

Replies

  • Grue wrote: »
    I rabbit holed a little on the anagrams, since the lines are long enough they are bound to produce something star wars related, but each line does produce something that could be something:

    1. Star Wars: Darth Bane: Dynasty of Evil --- leaves Foeeueyfyathihtbia
    2. death star, battle of yavin, defense of base --- leaves hmsthtifitothd
    3. Star Wars: Infinities: A New Hope --- leaves chngigkpmgmreapgegMyplayn
    4. Star Wars Force Unleashed: Ultimate Edition --- leaves spepandeKnnandjokeddbugoac
    5. Figrin Dan and the modal nodes -- leaves hpettohelpgetpwuce

    4 also can be "star wars knights of old republic dodonna", leaving "eismpeaduenanjkeAddeutenace" but I'd prefer to have star killer and it IS the 10 year anniversary of the Ultimate Sith Edition in November :smile:


    FWIW, if you assume that you can blend lines, you could use up the remaining to make other related stuff, but after going through this exercise, I think this is probably just coincidence and the wrong path to decoding the message.

    "star wars knights of old republic dodonna"---- Admiral Dodonna is the commader of one of the ships during the assault on the Star Forge when trying to defeat Malak. This could make some sense with the current OR characters

    http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Forn_Dodonna
  • What if we try using the word four rather then the number 4 to Baconify it?
  • sigsig wrote: »
    I think crumb has basically confirmed it's using the bacon cipher and isn't an anagram.

    Could it be both?
  • Lazerbeem wrote: »
    sigsig wrote: »
    I think crumb has basically confirmed it's using the bacon cipher and isn't an anagram.

    Could it be both?

    I doubt it. The only anagrams that make any sense removes letters.
  • TwiLek
    5 posts Member
    edited January 2019
    CG_SBCrumb wrote: »
    3pourr2 wrote: »
    Ultra wrote: »
    Crumb what did you have for lunch

    Lol I wondered if his lunch would give us a clue too.😂

    More Bacon then I get to the weekly word search in the newspaper
    I've gone through a number of ways of converting into a bacon cypher and currently can't get it to make any sense. Has anyone tried converting into bacon cipher using binary digit ie. 1 and 0 and then deciphering it as a binary cypher? May be what I look into next. Also think the above points towards the poem being a series of cryptic clues like that used on a crossword.

  • 3pourr2
    1927 posts Member
    Anyone converted to baconian and then to binary?
  • Digital_Delusion
    25 posts Member
    edited January 2019
    Hello there, I'm tracking this cracking all day and can add a little info:
    1. Dial uses all four coloumns to get scoundrels4life so looks like there is no other layer in it
    2. Could anagrams just tell us about login rewards, cause now for the 1st month it's Boba Fett's Slave 1 ?
    3. The date when the dial.pdf file was created is 2018-12-12 5c89v191yddk.jpg
  • Using punctuation as 'B' yields:
    • AAEAEAIIAACAAAACAAAACAAIACRAACABAABAACAABAAABAAAAEAREBA (26)
    • AAEAEAIIAACAAAACAAAACAAIACQAACABAABAACAABAAABAAAAEAQEBA (24)
  • Punctuation that included spaces and line breaks as 'B' yields:
    CQIYRDBBQURABKCIISEDCCCBARQQBQQDKAIQGIEMBEBQEIMEEIMIIRCGEEEIIMAZBRDA
  • CG_SBCrumb wrote: »
    3pourr2 wrote: »
    Ultra wrote: »
    Crumb what did you have for lunch

    Lol I wondered if his lunch would give us a clue too.😂

    More Bacon then I get to the weekly word search in the newspaper

    Word search, eh? Is that a new clue?
  • Is Crumb giving a hint with the wordsearch comment? Might work if you laid the plaintext out into a grid of letters using each line as a row.
    For the confirmed Bacon cipher, the issue is differenciating between As and ****. It could be 'scoundrels4life', as in those letters are 1 and the rest are the other. Or 'Beckett' as some think that is refrencing his quote.
    We just need to keep trying random things until one works.
    Btw, great puzzle, keeping us at it for days i expect
  • Kalikrates
    4 posts Member
    edited January 2019
    Word search again fits the Baconian acrostics better than the Bacon cipher. Fisto, Dathcha... now we have to search for more.
  • Is Crumb giving a hint with the wordsearch comment? Might work if you laid the plaintext out into a grid of letters using each line as a row.
    For the confirmed Bacon cipher, the issue is differenciating between As and ****. It could be 'scoundrels4life', as in those letters are 1 and the rest are the other. Or 'Beckett' as some think that is refrencing his quote.
    We just need to keep trying random things until one works.
    Btw, great puzzle, keeping us at it for days i expect

    @KaseySpacey will you post the Bacon decode with Scoundrels4Life as the key?
  • The word search comment makes me think it is Baconian acrostics like some one else has commented. Baconian acrostics is literally a word search.
  • Is Crumb giving a hint with the wordsearch comment? Might work if you laid the plaintext out into a grid of letters using each line as a row.
    For the confirmed Bacon cipher, the issue is differenciating between As and ****. It could be 'scoundrels4life', as in those letters are 1 and the rest are the other. Or 'Beckett' as some think that is refrencing his quote.
    We just need to keep trying random things until one works.
    Btw, great puzzle, keeping us at it for days i expect

    Not explicitly confirmed, but I agree. This looks like Crumb is giving a go-ahead on the Bacon cypher (probably used on only the letters of the cypher text, as @Pu55yRiot provided earlier) and that we need to figure out a word or words to use to identify the A's and B's. I don't think we should all give up on other avenues, but this sounds most promising.

    I've tried using FALCON and FLY SOLO, but they're clearly not producing plaintext. I'm going to try STAR WARS shortly. Letter frequency analysis suggests F, G, and Y may be appearing unusually often (see https://dcode.fr/frequency-analysis for some quick and dirty frequency analysis). Also, after playing around some, if F is a B, I think we can be confident that E, I, L, and O are not B's, because the Bacon cypher has no five-piece codes that start with BB. They all start with AA, AB, or BA.

  • Bacon Acrostics also tracks well with since "a pamphlet entitled The Story of the Learned Pig (circa 1786) and alleged research by James Wilmot have been described as the earliest instances of the claim that Bacon wrote Shakespeare's work, but the Wilmot research has been exposed as a forgery, and the pamphlet makes no reference to Bacon."

    Source is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baconian_theory_of_Shakespeare_authorship
    Do or Do not.

    DarthBarron (Kevin, aka KevWalker)
  • Might also try incorporating a rot cipher.
  • pbchillin
    12 posts Member
    edited January 2019
    Is it possible punctuation, like questions marks, capital letters or full stops are what signal the A's and B's?

    There's a lot of strange questions and one word sentences.
  • Tsuo_Vook wrote: »

    Not explicitly confirmed, but I agree. This looks like Crumb is giving a go-ahead on the Bacon cypher (probably used on only the letters of the cypher text, as @Pu55yRiot provided earlier) and that we need to figure out a word or words to use to identify the A's and B's. I don't think we should all give up on other avenues, but this sounds most promising.

    I've tried using FALCON and FLY SOLO, but they're clearly not producing plaintext. I'm going to try STAR WARS shortly. Letter frequency analysis suggests F, G, and Y may be appearing unusually often (see https://dcode.fr/frequency-analysis for some quick and dirty frequency analysis). Also, after playing around some, if F is a B, I think we can be confident that E, I, L, and O are not B's, because the Bacon cypher has no five-piece codes that start with BB. They all start with AA, AB, or BA.

    Something else you have to consider is what if we have A and B the wrong way round? If they start BB then maybe it right, and we need to change the B to A. We don't know if the letters in the key are A's or B's.
  • Is Crumb giving a hint with the wordsearch comment? Might work if you laid the plaintext out into a grid of letters using each line as a row.
    For the confirmed Bacon cipher, the issue is differenciating between As and ****. It could be 'scoundrels4life', as in those letters are 1 and the rest are the other. Or 'Beckett' as some think that is refrencing his quote.
    We just need to keep trying random things until one works.
    Btw, great puzzle, keeping us at it for days i expect

    @KaseySpacey will you post the Bacon decode with Scoundrels4Life as the key?

    Doesn't work :(
    By key you mean "if letter is in key, bacon value = A", right?
    • DIHFLZ?HAU?Z?FHJGYASWTFJJTXDWQQDGCISSKQFXBCDRNDQTOA
    • DIHFM??HAW???FHKG?ATYUFKKUZDYRRDGCITTLRFZBCDSODRUPA
    • ?XY?UGCY?LCGD?YWZH?NJM?WWMI?JPP?Z?XNNVP?I???OS?PMR?
    • ?Z??WGC??MCGD??Y?H?OKN?YYNI?KQQ???ZOOXQ?I???PT?QNS?
  • Using @Pu55yRiot's blocks I overlayed the Baconian/Binary sequence (repeating) for "scoundrels4life" to try to designate As and ****. It's a lot easier to follow using a monospaced font like Courier New. I'd suspect with all of the work people did to uncover "scoundrels4life" it's probably a passcode or key of some sort. No idea if I'm even approaching this correctly but perhaps there's another layer of substitution to decipher

    ForaTeasEduEWhYFlyFArBEatthiSTHatdbenAyviSiOnAryiD
    BAAABAAABAABBABBAABBABBAAAAABBBAAAAAABAAABABABAAAB

    FTEEWYFFABESTHASOAD

    hAvEmyBesthaToNfiTfaInttHebeStfEAtOTheRFoLDssadsTO
    ABABAABAAAAABABAABAABAAABAAABAABBABBAABBABBAAAAABB

    AEBTNTIHSEAOTRFLDTO

    PchangiNgkeEpFaRminGiMrEapIngtheWaGerSmyPlayS
    BAAAAAABAAABABABAAABABABAABAAAAABABAABAABAAAB

    PNEFRGMEIWGSPS

    winReaSOnISsiMPlEPairedANDtrueknOwfaNsAnDjokEaDdCl
    AAABAABBABBAABBABBAAAAABBBAAAAAABAAABABABAAABABABA

    RSOISMPEPANDONADEDC

    uEbutgeTtHenOdaCefaIlniGhaNDsTEmhOPeROtatedNOHelpgetPwddUnCe
    ABAAAAABABAABAABAAABAAABAABBABBAABBABBAAAAABBBAAAAAABAAABABA

    ETHOCIGNDTEOPRONOHPUC
  • I'm beginning to think there is a different method to deciphering each sentence of the poem as when looked at as a whole using any one cipher it doesn't make sense. I'm going to break it down into the separate sentences and see if this yields any results.
  • Tsuo_Vook
    62 posts Member
    edited January 2019
    Tsuo_Vook wrote: »

    Not explicitly confirmed, but I agree. This looks like Crumb is giving a go-ahead on the Bacon cypher (probably used on only the letters of the cypher text, as @Pu55yRiot provided earlier) and that we need to figure out a word or words to use to identify the A's and B's. I don't think we should all give up on other avenues, but this sounds most promising.

    I've tried using FALCON and FLY SOLO, but they're clearly not producing plaintext. I'm going to try STAR WARS shortly. Letter frequency analysis suggests F, G, and Y may be appearing unusually often (see https://dcode.fr/frequency-analysis for some quick and dirty frequency analysis). Also, after playing around some, if F is a B, I think we can be confident that E, I, L, and O are not B's, because the Bacon cypher has no five-piece codes that start with BB. They all start with AA, AB, or BA.

    Something else you have to consider is what if we have A and B the wrong way round? If they start BB then maybe it right, and we need to change the B to A. We don't know if the letters in the key are A's or B's.

    True, but like I said, we do know that no valid five-piece code in the Bacon cypher starts with BB. Check the Wikipedia entry if you don't believe me; this is true because they're essentially numbered forward from aaaaa / binary 00000, and there are 32 possible configurations. None of the configurations starting with BB are reached before all letters are exhausted.

    It's not much, but it's more helpful than randomly guessing code words to split the b's and a's. I'm assuming all the strings successfully decode, which suggests that it can't be the case that both letters at the start of any of the five-letter strings can both be B's.

    EDIT: Actually, this only holds if we're doing the 24-letter encoding option. If we're doing the full 26-letter option, Y's and Z's both have BB strings in the front. These are both uncommon letters, though---so even if the BB rule doesn't hold absolutely, it should be very close to holding in practice.
  • I read the first line and thought, “Oh, screw this....” So congrats to all you wonderful, glorious nerds out there doing the work and cyphering this out! Have fun!
    Ceterum censeo Patientia esse meliat.
  • Punctuation that included spaces and line breaks as 'B' yields:
    CQIYRDBBQURABKCIISEDCCCBARQQBQQDKAIQGIEMBEBQEIMEEIMIIRCGEEEIIMAZBRDA


    Vigenere decode with key 'SCOUNDRELS4LIFE' gives:
    KOUEEAKXFCSPTFYQGEKQZLYQISFIWMYBWGVNPETUCTTLAQKQKVJREGKHTWZEQKMFOOMW
    
    Vigenere decode with key 'SCOUNDRELSDLIFE' (4=D) gives:
    KOUEEAKXFCOPTFYQGEKQZLYQIOFIWMYBWGVNPETUYTTLAQKQKVJREGKDTWZEQKMFOOMW
    
  • Is it possible that letters in the text could be turned into numbers via the Parsec numbers table/dial?

    SCOUNDRELS4LIFE could be the examples where that was solved we need to get the basic letters in place?
  • Since crumb has said bacon and more bacon, maybe it's bacon cipher and then bacon acrostics
  • TwiLek
    5 posts Member
    edited January 2019
    Punctuation that included spaces and line breaks as 'B' yields:
    CQIYRDBBQURABKCIISEDCCCBARQQBQQDKAIQGIEMBEBQEIMEEIMIIRCGEEEIIMAZBRDA


    Vigenere decode with key 'SCOUNDRELS4LIFE' gives:
    KOUEEAKXFCSPTFYQGEKQZLYQISFIWMYBWGVNPETUCTTLAQKQKVJREGKHTWZEQKMFOOMW
    
    Vigenere decode with key 'SCOUNDRELSDLIFE' (4=D) gives:
    KOUEEAKXFCOPTFYQGEKQZLYQIOFIWMYBWGVNPETUYTTLAQKQKVJREGKDTWZEQKMFOOMW
    

    Have you tried using scoundrels4life as the passphrase?
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